Create more, destroy less

I’ve recently read that we should consume less and create more, and it’s a very worthwhile read that much more elaborately expands on what I wrote about Gadget Zombies couple years ago. I wrote my original post 7 years ago, but it’s one of the few things I’ve written that aged surprisingly well, and it’s […]

Learning to unlearn

I couple years ago I had lunch with a successful serial entrepreneur in San Francisco. Mid way into the conversation we talked about which ideas get funded on Sand Hill Road and which do not. One thing we both agreed on is that no VC will fund projects without product-market fit. Fascinatingly, the lack of […]

What I learned from going to a design conference

I just came back from Awwwards LA and had a blast. While not technically a design conference (they cross over quite a bit, which is why they invited folks like myself and Sarah), the largest part of the audience were designers (as opposed to developers, my usual audience). Here’s what I thought was interesting and […]

Long live the Desktop

In his Ode to the Desktop, Dion writes: I consumed more and created less I’ve written down similar thoughts many years ago, and I’m glad we’re having this discussion again. The above summarizes the biggest flaw of the new and shiny. Tablets and phones are inferior when it comes to most creative tasks: Worse input […]

Trust Issues

The trusty little button What happens when you click a button a 100 times and it does the same thing every time you click it? You start to develop a relationship with said button. You now trust the button to do the thing it did before when you click it the 101st time. This trust is a fundamental […]

When IE gave us beautiful, fast touch interactions, and nobody cared.

It’s very hard to build a responsive, touch-enabled carousel. Or any draggable container. So hard, in fact, that many (ok Hacker News, a few! 5 in fact.) years ago at Zynga, we’ve spent months to build our own scrolling abstraction that handled the calculations for smooth scrolling, panning and zooming. That project was the Zynga Scroller, […]

Ubisoft Propaganda

I rarely post commentary. But Ubisoft trying to look smart by suggesting that lower frame rates are better anyway, after I spent many months writing an extended explanation as to why high frame rates matter? Yeah, nice try. Ubisoft made headlines when suggesting 30 fps in games “feels better for players”, after announcing their decision to cap Assassin’s […]

The web is built to last

Native platform providers boast with the large new feature sets they add to their OS’es every year.  But when comparing themselves directly to the web platform, they’re conveniently missing the simple fact that they can do so only for the lack of standardization. Corporate platforms come and go and rarely last longer than a decade. The […]

Bigger is not better

One common misconception that I’m hearing over and over is that popularity of a product is an indication of its quality. I’ve met (and worked with) many that were convinced that a game, for instance, had to be popular to be “good”. By that logic, McDonalds is the best restaurant in the world. It’s just […]

Game developments impact on technology

It’s easy to dismiss games and game development in general. To check it off as “playing around” with technology (pun intended), rather than serious investments. But if you’re building a technology platform and are not seriously investing into games and game developer ecosystems from the get-go, you’re doing it horribly, horribly wrong. Let’s even forget […]